And we only think about ourselves.

I am Shadib Newaz and this is where I share everything I enjoy.

Further Thoughts on Lady Gaga And ArtPop That Are Too Long For Twitter

billwerde:

A handful of Gaga fans and others who seem to randomly enjoy theatrics have regularly misconstrued level, critical thinking as Gaga attacks. I will say, the thing I do regret is taking to Twitter once and chiding Gaga about tweeting a link that went to a playlist of her video on repeat in order to…

tedxyorku:

A photo series captured behind the scenes during our rehearsals.

sciencesfiction:

An epic drama of adventure and exploration.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968; dir. Stanley Kubrick)

fntboyblue:

The Kubrick Stare

blas11:

We all fear death and question our place in the universe. The artist’s job is not to succumb to despair, but to find an antidote for the emptiness of existence.

blas11:

We all fear death and question our place in the universe. The artist’s job is not to succumb to despair, but to find an antidote for the emptiness of existence.

misterbenwhishaw:

"That Paris exists and anyone could choose to live anywhere else in the world will always be a mystery to me."

(Source: theartofcinema)

“People disappear when they die. Their voice, their laughter, the warmth of their breath. Their flesh. Eventually their bones. All living memory of them ceases. This is both dreadful and natural. Yet for some there is an exception to this annihilation. For in the books they write they continue to exist. We can rediscover them. Their humor, their tone of voice, their moods. Through the written word they can anger you or make you happy. They can comfort you. They can perplex you. They can alter you. All this, even though they are dead. Like flies in amber, like corpses frozen in the ice, that which according to the laws of nature should pass away is, by the miracle of ink on paper, preserved. It is a kind of magic.”

—   The Thirteenth Tale; Diane Setterfield (via mylittlebookofquotes)

filmrevues:

The Pianist (2002) - dir. Roman Polanski

The only problems I have with this otherwise perfect film are - and pay attention I’ll only say this once - the first thirty-five minutes and the fact that no one needed this film to be made (well… no one not named Roman Polanski). The story is an incredible one, and the final scene is one of the finest showcases of cinematic drama in the history of the art form. But it does take just a little too long to get going and who - in 2002 - was looking at the film industry and thought… hey, let’s make another Holocaust film?

The Pianist will always, however unfairly, be compared to Spielberg’s Schindler’s List. While Brody outshines the likes of Neeson or Fiennes there is nothing in here that is as jarring as Spielberg’s portrayal. Polanski’s auteurism seeps out of the film’s every pore, but even still the film isn’t one you’d want to delve back into time and time again. Still, the Pianist is a modern classic and deserves your attention, if only once.

8.3

“What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn’t happen much, though.”

—   J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye (via shauntaylor)

“One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world.” 
-Malala Yousafzai 

“One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world.” 

-Malala Yousafzai 

(via throughoutourworld-deactivated2)

Beatrice Straight won Oscar as a supporting actress in 1976’s Network with screen time of less than 5 minutes. 
Read more at http://www.omg-facts.com/Celebs/The-Shortest-Performance-To-Be-Nominated/31162#hFd3xWX8swJyPti7.99